Fred Mandell Author.Artist.Speaker.Creative Catalyst

Recent Bloutchers

Recent Bloutchers

The Child and the Fox; A Parable in Two Parts

In This Bloutcher

Where Art, Life and Leadership Collide

  • The Child and the Fox; A Parable in Two Parts
  • Some upcoming events

The Child and the Fox; A Parable in Two Parts

Part 1: There is a child in the deep forest who is approached by a fox. The child is fascinated by the fox. He thinks the fox is a beautiful creature, its thick orange coat rich and soft to the touch. The child loves the fox’s sense of humor and its fun loving nature. They begin to dance and play together. The fox allows the child to ride on its back. But the child is new to the forest and does not know its ways or how to gather food or water. So the fox brings the child berries and shows him a cool stream from which to drink. As dusk settles, the child snuggles up to the fox and falls asleep.
When the child wakes he tells the fox he is hungry. The fox tells the child he must learn to howl before the fox can bring him his berries. So the child learns to howl and, true to his word, the fox brings the child a gourd filled with berries. With a full stomach the child and fox begin to dance and play again. That night the child snuggles again into the fox’s warm, furry body and falls fast asleep.
The next day, when the child grows hungry, the fox tells him he must learn to catch a bird before the fox can bring him food. So the child watches the fox stalk a bird and catch it in its mouth and then the child tries but cannot catch the bird. The fox brings the child a gourd filled with berries and tells the child he will try again tomorrow. That night before going to bed the child howls with anticipation of the next day.
In the morning, the child again watches the fox catch a bird. He notices how the fox moves slowly, quietly until it is just the right moment and then the fox knocks the bird down and clenches the bird in his mouth. This time the child follows exactly what he saw the fox do and he catches the bird. Both the child and the fox grin at this achievement. Then they both howl with satisfaction.
The next day when the child wakes up the fox is gone. After looking for the fox, the child realizes he is hungry. At first he is not sure what to do. But then he leans back and cranes his neck toward the tree tops and begins to howl. Then he stalks and catches a bird.
That night he nestles alone into a soft patch of thistle and feels a rumbling in his stomach and he realizes he is still hungry.

1024px-Fox_Hunt_1893_Winslow_Homer                                                                               Winslow Homer–The Fox
Part 2: There is a child in the deep forest who is approached by a fox. The child is fascinated by the fox. He thinks the fox is a beautiful creature, its thick orange coat rich and soft to the touch. The child loves the fox’s grin and sense of humor and its fun loving nature. They begin to dance and play together. The fox allows the child to ride on its back. But the child is new to the forest and does not know its ways or how to gather food or water. So the fox brings the child berries and shows him a cool stream from which to drink. As dusk settles, the child snuggles up to the fox and falls asleep.
When the child wakes he tells the fox he is hungry. The fox tells the child he must learn to howl before the fox can bring him his berries. But the child hesitates and says to the fox. But you Mr. Fox have a beautiful voice. Why don’t we sing together so the creatures of the forest will be happy and they will be inspired by the beautiful sounds of the forest? Now this fox is a wily fellow and not persuaded so easily. So the child begins to sing by himself and the creatures in the forest come forward and perch themselves on the branches and on the flora.
When the child awakes the next day the fox is gone. The child looks everywhere for the fox but cannot find him. He soon realizes he is hungry but does not know what to do. He cannot ask the fox to forage him berries. The child sits on the forest floor and begins to gently weep. He feels deeply alone and afraid. To calm himself he begins to hum to himself. He then starts to sing and the forest comes alive with its creatures, each one bringing a berry and before long the child is no longer hungry.
Moral: Creativity is living your own truth in harmony with nature.

 

Some Upcoming Events

  • At Prof Nancy Adler’s invitation I will be co-teaching her Global Leadership program at McGill toward the end of August.  This three day program introduces MBA students at the Desautels School of Management to their two year degree experience.  We will be incorporating the arts into this cutting edge program which raises the question:  How can we lead beautifully in our modern world?
  • I will be speaking at the Art of Management Conference, also at the end of August, in Copenhagen.  The topic of my talk is:  Art as Encounter and Agent for Leadership Transformation.
  • We are in the process of creating a website for The Global Institute for the Arts and Leadership (TGIAL) and are aiming for a late September launch.  Stay tuned.
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